“The greatest sadness of all is to forget how to play” is a quote I have long admired. Determined to keep my playful spirit alive and well I arrived on Reunion Island with nothing before me except a whole Pandora’s Box of adventures to unpack. For a few days of carefree fun this island seemed like just the ticket.

The next day I somehow find myself even higher still, simultaneously clutching my seat for dear life while whooping in excitement. Pascal (paragliding pilot extraordinaire) and I are flying high above the snow, circling and turning and spinning and generally acting like excitable puppies let off the leash.

“There are some activities that simply have to be done on a trip to London: seeing Buckingham Palace and the changing of the guard is one such item, as is strolling across Tower Bridge and watching it open from the bank of the Thames River. Here are our tips on how to see it all – and keep the kids entertained!

Our household is blessed with an energetic and imaginative three-year old, so most days involve wild and fantastical games starring elaborate castles, dragons and fairy princesses. Our announcement of a beach holiday to the Isle of Wight was met with squeals of delight and an instant obsession with sandcastles, pirates and (for some unknown reason) starfish. Once the countdown was finally complete (three-year olds are not known for their patience) we set off on our seaside summer escapade.

In my mind, Scotland is the land of cruel misconceptions and nasty national clichés. I’d spent my life being told that Scots were stingy, unfriendly, ugly and hard to understand. So, one day I decided to pack my bags and go find out for myself, and hopefully meet William Wallace, bagpipes, kilts, haggis, whisky and all things Scottish along the way.

A big shout out to Tim Bertrand for this epic video from Malawi… Tim, thanks for showing us where one half of our G&T initials (the Tea part) hail from!